Andrew Rogerson

Professor of Biology & Vice President, Academic Affairs
Ph.D. University of Stirling, Scotland, U.K. 1979
Voicemail: (707) 664-2028
Email: andrew.rogerson@sonoma.edu
Office: Stevenson Hall 1041

Postdoctoral Experience/Prior Appointments:

University of Toronto, Canada; Atlantic Research Laboratory, Canada; Freshwater Biological Association, England; University of California – Santa Barbara; University of London, England; South Dakota School of Mines & Technology; Oceanographic Center, Nova Southeastern University; Marshall University; Fresno State University.

Research Interests:

Throughout a varied academic career spanning 30 years, I have been involved in research featuring eukaryotic microbes across many disciplines including ecology, taxonomy, physiology, cell biology and molecular biology. Most recently I have been involved in research areas summarized below.
The role of protists (algae and protozoa), particularly naked amoebae, in material cycling (C, N and P) is poorly understood and worthy of attention in terms of ecosystem function. Over the years, I have become an authority on the taxonomy and identification of naked amoebae and have popularized their numerical importance and ubiquitous distribution globally. Some amoebae are opportunistic pathogens, such as Acanthamoeba, that can invade the cornea and cause the sight-threatening disease amoebic keratitis. I have been involved in research trying to understand the triggers that cause these free-living amoebae to become pathogenic. I have also been working on drawing attention to another overlooked group of protists – the apochloritic diatoms. These marine pennate diatoms are colorless (i.e. heterotrophic) and their ecologicial role has been ignored despite the fact that I have shown them to be numerically important in beach sand, mangrove waters, and temperate coastal waters.
I have research interests in ballast water treatment, specifically in verifying the biological kill rate of emerging treatment technologies. I serve on the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) panel (a partnership between EPA, NSF International, and the U.S. Coast Guard) helping to devise protocols and standards for the industry and future regulation. I was also involved with the first land based testing facility of treatment systems at the Navy Research Laboratory in Key West, FL.
Funded by the EPA, I have studied the presence and significance of fecal microbes in Florida beach sand. This is distinct from the current practice of looking for indicator bacteria in the water as a means of gauging the quality of a bathing beach. This was a high profile study given the importance of clean beaches to the economy of Florida and the results may change how bathing beaches are monitored.

Representative Publications:

COMETA , I., SCHATZ, S., TRZYNA, W. and ROGERSON, A. 2011. Tolerance of naked amoebae to low oxygen levels with an emphasis on the genus Acanthamoeba. Acta Protozoologica. In press.

COMETA, I., ROGERSON, A., and S. SCHATZ. 2010. Efficacy of hand held, inexpensive UV light sources on Acanthamoeba, causative organism in Amoebic Keratitis. J. Clinical Optometry 2: 9 - 15.

TRZYNA, W.C., MBUGUA, M.W. and A. ROGERSON. 2010. Acanthamoeba in the domestic water supply of Huntington, West Virginia, U.S.A. Acta Protozooologica 49: 9-15.

BLACKBURN, M.V., HANNAH, F., and A. ROGERSON. 2009. First account of apochloritic diatoms from mangrove waters in Florida. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology. 56: 194-200.

HARTZ, A., CUVELIER, M., NOWOSIELSKI, K., BONILLA, T.D., GREEN, M., ESIOBU, N., McCORQUODALE, D.S., and A. ROGERSON. 2008. Survival potential of E. coli and enterococci in sub-tropical beach sand: implications for water quality managers. Journal Environmental Quality. 37: 898-905.

SHOFF, M.E., ROGERSON, A. SHATZ, S., and SEAL. D.V. 2007. Variable responses of Acanthamoeba strains to three multipurpose lens cleaning solutions. Optometry and Vision Science. 84: 202-207.

VOGEL, C., ROGERSON, A., SCHATZ, S., LAUBACH, H., TALLMAN, A. and FELL, J. 2007. Prevalence of yeasts in beach sand at three bathing beaches in south Florida. Water Research. 41:1915-1920.

SHOFF, M.E., ROGERSON, A., KESSLER, K., SCHATZ, S., and SEAL, D.V. 2007. Prevalence of Acanthamoeba and other naked amoebae in south Florida tap water. Journal of Water Health 6: 99-104.

BONILLA, T.D., NOWOSIELSKI, K., ESIOBU, N., McCORQUODALE, D.S. and ROGERSON, A. 2006. Species assemblages of Enterococcus indicate potential sources of fecal bacteria at a south Florida recreational beach. Marine Pollution Bulletin 52: 807-810.

DAVIDIAN, T., NOWOSIELSKI, K., ESIOBU, N., McCORQUODALE, D.S. and ROGERSON, A. 2006. High counts of fecal bacteria in beach sand of south Florida and implications for water managers. Marine Pollution Bulletin. 52: 807-810.

BONILLA, T.D., NOWOSIELSKI, K., ESIOBU, N., McCORQUODALE, D.S. and ROGERSON, A. 2006. Species assemblages of Enterococcus indicate potentia sources of fecal bacteria at a south Florida recreational beach. Marine Pollution Bulletin 52: 807-810.

DAVIDIAN, T., NOWOSIELSKI, K., ESIOBU, N., McCORQUODALE, D.S. and ROGERSON, A. 2006. High counts of fecal bacteria in beach sand of south Florida and implications for water managers. Marine Pollution Bulletin. 52: 807-810.

HAUER, G. and ROGERSON, A. 2005. Remarkable salinity tolerance of seven species of naked amoebae (gymnamoebae). Hydrobiologia 549: 33-42.

HAUER, G. and ROGERSON, A. 2005. Heterotrophic protozoa from hypersaline environments. In: Adaptation To Life at High Salt Concentrations in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya", edited by Nina Gunde-Cimerman, Aharon Oren and Ana Plemenita Series: Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology, vol 9.

DOBBS, F.C. and A. ROGERSON. 2005. Can we ever remove, kill, or inactivat all the microorganisms from ship's ballast water, and should we try? Environmental Science & Technology June 15: 259 – 264.

MAYBRUCK, B.T. and A. ROGERSON. 2004. Protozoan epibionts on the prop roots of the red mangrove tree, Rhizophora mangle. Protistology 3: 265-272

BOOTON, G.C., ROGERSON, A., BONILLA, T.D., SEAL, D.V., KELLY, D.J., BEATTIE, T.K., TOMLINSON, A., LARES-VILLA, F., FUERST, P.A. and BYERS, T.J. 2004. Molecular and physiological evaluation of subtropical environmental isolates of Acanthamoeba spp., causal agent of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 51: 192-200.