Brantley L. Bryant

Associate Professor
Literature (Early British, Medieval)

Office: Nichols Hall 362A
Phone: (707) 664-2164
Email: brantley.bryant@sonoma.edu

What I Do at SSU

I teach a wide range of courses from first-year writing and upper division G. E., to key major courses such as Literary Analysis and Early British Survey, as well as senior-level courses and M. A. seminars. I specialize in the literature of the European Middle Ages, particularly Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340-1400) and late medieval British literature. Some recent senior-level and M. A. course titles have included: "Dreadful Joy: Love in Chaucer's Dream Visions and Troy Poems," "King Arthur and England," "Medieval Monsters," and "Medieval Literature and the Boundaries of the Human." I am glad to advise M. A. theses dealing with any aspect of late medieval literature, especially Chaucer.

Bio

Brantley Bryant joined the SSU English department in Fall 2007 after completing a Ph.D. in English at Columbia University in New York. His research and teaching interests include Geoffrey Chaucer and late medieval literature in England, literature in relation to social and political history, women's writing, the history of sexuality, medievalism in popular culture, and posthuman theory. Bryant received the Sonoma State Excellence in Teaching Award and the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce Excellence in Teaching Award in 2013. His current long-term projects include an investigation of water, ecology, seafaring, and drought in medieval poetry. He is part of the lead editorial team for The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales, a resource for first-time students of Chaucer featuring essays produced by an international team of scholars that will be made available free of charge online.

Selected Scholarship

“One Does Not Simply Laugh in Middle Earth: Sacrificing Humor in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings.” postmedieval: A Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies 5.2. (2014): 184-198.

"H. P. Lovecraft's 'Unnamable' Middle Ages," in Gail Ashton and Daniel T. Kline, eds. Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

“Time to Reach Out.” postmedieval FORUM I: Historicity without Historicism, Responses to Paul Strohm. Ed. Holly Crocker. Online. https://postmedieval-forum.com/forums/forum-i-responses-to-paul-strohm/bryant/

Geoffrey Chaucer Hath a Blog: Medieval Studies and New Media. With Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Robert W. Hanning, and Bonnie Wheeler. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

"Talking with the Taxman about Poetry: England's Economy in 'Against the King's Taxes' and Wynnere and Wastoure." Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History 5 (2008): 219-248. link

“‘By Extorcions I Lyve’: Chaucer’s Friar’s Tale and Corrupt Officials.” The Chaucer Review 42 (2007): 180-195. link

****For graduate advertising material: - written with potential grad student audience in mind

Brantley Bryant joined the SSU English department in Fall 2007 after completing a Ph.D. in English at Columbia University in New York. His research and teaching interests include Geoffrey Chaucer and late medieval literature in England, literature in relation to social and political history, women's writing, the history of sexuality, medievalism in popular culture, and posthuman theory. He has published work on Chaucer's poetry, on alliterative political poetry, and on the treatment of the medieval in popular culture. Bryant received the Sonoma State Excellence in Teaching Award and the Santa Rosa Chamber of Commerce Excellence in Teaching Award in 2013. His current long-term projects include an investigation of water, ecology, seafaring, and drought in medieval poetry. He is part of the lead editorial team for The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales, a resource for first-time students of Chaucer featuring essays produced by an international team of scholars that will be made available free of charge online. Bryant is glad to advise M. A. theses on any aspect of late medieval literature, especially Chaucer, as well as theses on the medieval in popular culture.